“Who Am I?” The most timeless question of the entire human species.

Our actions are defined by how we see ourselves. If I am with my children, I am much less prone to swear than when I am alone. Why is that? Because when I am with my children I see myself as a father and good fathers don’t use foul language in front of their children.

We all play many roles. Worker, parent, child, athlete, coach, friend, mentor, CEO, volunteer, boy, girl, academic. These roles, affiliations with schools, churches, associations, and career choices all shape our identity. The books, blogs, magazines we read, the music we listen to, the movies and tv shows we watch all influence how we see ourselves as well. The identity we see in ourselves is created by the characteristics from these inputs.

Because we value each input differently, some with greater weight than others, the influence of some inputs will be dominant. A classic example is a teenage boy or girl who gets a boyfriend/girlfriend or a new set of friends. Have you ever noticed how quickly their behavior is modified? This is a drastic example of someone behaving in a new way to reflect a sense of identity and or values. Another dramatic example might be a co-worker who gets a promotion to team manager.

One role that we all share, whether we accept it or not, is that we are all a Child of God. Some may have been simply told this, others believe it, few know it and even less have internalized the impact of this truth. As a literal spirit Child of God, we inherently possess his spiritual DNA. So what does this mean? It depends. Do you care that you are his child? If not, then it means nothing. But even if the idea of being Gods child, loved indescribably and without condition, sparks just an ounce of hope, then this means everything.

As Gods own child you are loved. You are important. You matter. You have the inherit capability to make a unique and meaningful contribution to those around you. With the unlimited potential that all Children of God possess this knowledge alone can forever shape your behaviors for good. How does a Child of God treat others? How does this Child approach adversity? How does a Child of God handle educational pursuits, athletic competitions, and career objectives?

By valuing above every other role, that of a Child of God, all negative influences that might normally manifest themselves in our behavior, will be unceremoniously removed from our conduct. Only the best of each role we play will be tolerated. Our fullest potential will be unhindered.

I conclude with this question and answer. Who are you? You are Child of God, act like one.

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